Pepino Torino 1884

The packaging of cones and cups has evolved simply. The main problem has been to find attractive graphics, since all the contents, from the logo to the flavor, as well as the ingredients, weight, and address is printed on the disc closure.

History

The Royal Coat of Arms
Evolution Of The Logo

Evolution Of The Packaging

Evolution Of Communication

The cup is another classic. Gelati Pepino has always offered numerous variations including single and two flavor. For packaging, Gelati Pepino only uses white containers with a blue logo printed on the side. This brings both simplicity and a minimalist, classic style which is clear and uncluttered.

The cone is produced in two varieties: two flavors and a single flavor, all finished with chopped hazelnuts and wrapped in semi-mat paper. Over time it became a bit sad and obsolete and needed brightening up to become more visible, while at the same time avoiding becoming too loud. In reaction to the market, the packageing evolved into a parallel stripped wrapping of glossy silver and blue that follow a cork screwed pattern from the tip to the base interrupted only in the center with an oval containing the logo. The cone has the locking disc closure with the same writing and colors as on the cup.

The cookie, containing two flavors of ice cream between two cookies, was added to the product range a few years ago. A similar cookie was produced in the past and offered as fior di latte with a cookie but with a different wrapping. This was called "Gelatino Sport".

The sorbet on stick, has the same mold and wrapping as the Pinguino® and is a relatively recent addition.

A product that has undergone another transformation in package appearance and technology is the bucket: a container holding 1/2 liter of one flavor of ice cream typically for home use. Recently, the previous bucket has been replaced with one of a more streamlined shape, although the look is almost unchanged. An adhesive on the cap shows the flavor and the two lateral adhesive wings seal the bucket. Today, this is called the Mezzolitro.